Super Bowl Sunday

Super Bowl and New Media

Think of the insane work that goes into only a few hours of national greatness called The Super Bowl. The food, the drinks, the stadium, the clothing, the uniforms….even the parking at the stadium. Millions of dollars in transactions are spent preparing for one night – check out some crazy stats from Time Magazine.

And then there are the commercials.


^^ Volkwagon’s Darth Vader commercial was one of the biggest hits during the Super Bowl.

Without the million-dollar commercials, it’s safe to say the Super Bowl wouldn’t be as glamorous as it is now. Some viewers watch more for the ads than the game. Even my focus shifts if the Packers aren’t the playing…

Advertising in a New Age

Technology changes drastically every year. Consumers want to be engaged more every year. Super Bowl advertisers don’t want to lose their connection with their 111.4 million viewers. So how are advertisers using new media this year?

Pick the Ending

    • Doritos is letting viewers pick which homemade commercial to air during the Super Bowl – a tactic they’ve used before. But ABC News says Coke is doing something a little different. They’re letting viewers pick the ending. And they’re meeting the viewer halfway. People don’t have to log in at Coke’s website to vote, they can also hashtag their pick on Twitter. You have to admit you are much more likely to cooperate when it’s through a platform you already have (Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, etc.). Whether or not this ends up working well for Coke or not, they’re catching on…

 

Sneak Peaks/Trailers

    • Some companies have tried showing entire commercials to consumer, which has worked, but marketers from places like Proctor & Gamble and Kraft foods are trying a different approach.

      ^^Tide’s “sneak peak” banner to create buzz for the real deal on Sunday.

      According to the NY Times, P & G and Kraft are offering up a sneak peak/trailer of their commercials. They are also encouraging consumers to spread talk about the sneak peaks on social media. Proctor’s goal is to generate buzz with their “teaser campaigns.” Will it work? We’ll find out after the Bowl if saving the big reveal for Sunday was the right move.

 

^^Kraft’s Mio Fit Sneak Peak

Premiere of a New Product

    • After the advent of the iPhone and Droid phones, the Blackberry has struggled to hold on to their market share. Research in Motion stated they will reveal the new Blackberry 10 at the Super Bowl. Other than that, they’ve been pretty hush hush. Volkswagon pulled a similar stunt when revealing the revamped Beetle design, but not many companies go quite that big. RIM needs a big move like the Super Bowl, because Blackberry is struggling. This is another campaign to keep an eye on and follow up after the game.

 

Go More In-Depth…

We never want you to feel limited to only what we’ve posted. Here are a list of other articles you can check out:

 

Wrap Up

Next week we will do a follow up of the ads aired during the Super Bowl – What worked? What didn’t? Did P & G pull of their sneak peak strategy?

Stay tuned, and if there’s something that interests you or you want us to talk about, let us know.

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The World at Our Fingertips

mobiledevices

Apps, Ads, and the Mobile World

Mobile devices are clearly the reason new media has exploded in today’s society. Users can do almost everything with the swipe of their finger, no matter where they are. iPhones have countless apps available for fun, business, and everything in between. Tablets now come cell-service ready for constant Internet access. Society is going mobile, and advertisers are catching on.

We’re Not All That Different

All traditional media rely primarily on advertising to make money, whether it’s for profit or just to cover costs. Television, magazines, newspapers – they all need advertisers. Well, unless they have insanely generous donators. New media runs the same way. Websites cost money to built, host, and maintain. Apps require time to develop. They need money.

Advertisers are starting to go beyond basic Web ads and looking at mobile devices and apps. But just like every other aspect of life, there are pros and cons. If you are considering whether or not to pursue mobile advertising, then keep reading.

Pros and Cons of Mobile Ads

Pros

  • Ads don’t have as much competition
    Because mobile web pages and apps are designed to be more simple, a lot of the distracting extras are left out. Facebook advertisers have found that more people will actually click on the ads in the app because they stand out more.
  • More people are going mobile every day
    604 million. Yup, that’s a lot of Facebook users on the mobile app or mobile website. That number grows every day. While not every advertiser can afford a place on Facebook, it at least illustrates the growth. The number of app downloads is expected to grow to 32 billion. Facebook is just one example. Check out this video from Google that explains just how mobile we really are:

  • Free apps sell more
    Everyone loves Angry Birds. Well, I don’t personally, but I know a lot of people do. One reason so many people love it (beyond its normal awesomeness) is that it’s free. As a broke college student, there are few words more valuable than “FREE.” Many users are willing to put up with interrupting ads if it means having a free experience.

Cons

  • Information overload
    Too much of anything can be a bad thing. Always remember that “content is king,” and too many ads can be overbearing and unappealing. While mobile ads are so quickly on the rise, there eventually is a limit – but advertisers may not know the limit until it’s too late.
  • No cookies
    On a desktop PC, advertisers can narrowly target its audience. How? Well, the Internet uses cookies to collect information about the users. Using a fancy algorithm, advertisers can use that information to advertise to exactly who they want.
    cookiemonster

    Apple said “no no” to this. Their devices don’t allow third-party cookies, so it’s harder to pinpoint an audience. But put it into perspective. All traditional media advertising operate on “best guess” research, and it works pretty well. It’s just not pin-point accurate.

  • Lack of rich media
    Steve Jobs is just such a trendsetter, isn’t he? Well, since he gave the thumbs down to Adobe Flash Player, almost all mobile devices are phasing out support for it. While HTML5 and CSS3 are great, Flash has a few more tricks up its sleeves for design capabilities. Advertisers have to find a way to catch its audience’s eye without using Flash.
  • Multiple platforms
    Just like desktop PCs, there are a million fish in the sea. iPhone 4, iPhone 5, Andriod, iPad, Windows tablets – there are many platforms that have different resolutions and setups. It can be a pain to satisfy all platforms, so decide if you’re up to the task.

Go More In-Depth…

We never want you to feel limited to only what we’ve posted. Here are a list of other articles you can check out:

Wrap Up

Remember that the purpose of this blog is to help you understand the new media world better through the eyes of PR/Advertising. Through dialogue, we can discuss and share what’s working, what’s not, and what to expect. New media is changing our world, and each week we want to explore it.

Stay tuned for next week’s post. If there’s something that interests you or you want us to talk about, let us know.

Basics of PR and New Media

Pr 2.0

Intro to PR/Advertising 2.0

The learning curve for new technology is huge. Developers push out new products and new media every day. Talk about information overload. For anyone who wants to publicize or advertise themselves, where do you start? What avenues do you use, and to what extent? Organizations, businesses, and individuals all have to consider how new media will play a role in their promotions.

At least in this day and age.

Before we start blogging in-depth about the latest in PR/Advertising and new media, it’s a good idea to start with the basics. If you’re considering new media in your promotions, think about the following:

  • Target audience
  • The industry are you involved in
  • Budget $$
  • Manpower and technology savvy

1. Target Audience

This should drive everything and anything you do. Your audience is responsible for your success, so why focus on them?

Look at the demographics and psychographics of your audience – compare it to what’s out there for new media. For examples, if your main customers are middle-aged mothers, then LinkedIn or Facebook is probably a better option than Twitter for social networking.

To save you some time, we found the social media demographics of 2012.

If you’re looking into advertising, consider algorithm-based advertising. Some smart techy guys found a way to gather info from Internet users so advertisers can reach only those they want to reach, no matter what website the user is on. Its methods aren’t perfect, but it’s a start of precise targeting.

2. Industry

Look at what other people are doing in your industry. Are they on the new media bandwagon yet? Are they the pioneers of what’s up and coming, or is everyone resisting change? We’re not saying you have to do they’re doing, but it’s smart to see what’s up.

Five industries are experiencing a huge shift in their business model because of new media. For them, it’s either change or get left in the dust:

  • Travel
  • Video rental
  • Music
  • Newspapers
  • Bookstores

3. Budget

The main reason new media has blown up…it’s darn cheap. Many businesses and individuals have gained popularity through the Internet. Where would J-Biebs be without YouTube? And think of how apps have changed the mobile world for…well just about any business who took the time to develop one.

New media can be a great startup option for promotions on a low budget, but add a couple dollars and you can quickly have a very powerful advertising tool on your hand. Think of how many people see those ads in the free version of Words With Friends…

4. Manpower/Knowledge

Here’s the hard part. If you don’t know much about the “Interweb,” managing your new media can be difficult – timing tweets properly is important, conversational blogging can be hard to do, websites take a lot of maintenance, and building apps requires nerdy knowledge.

So just be careful to not get in over your head. Connecting to your audience through social media can be hard if you have too many irons in the fire, and using more technological methods like online ads, websites, and apps can take a lot of work. Match your manpower and new media savvy to your goals.

Next Week

Now that we’ve laid down the basic relationship between PR/Advertising and new media, we can really start getting our hands dirty. Check back next week to see what we talk about more specifically next. Comment below if you have anything to say, and follow us if you think we’re not boring (we like to think we’re pretty alright).

Our Very First Post

Welcome Welcome!

Glad you could join us for our very first post. We are a group of communication students from North Dakota State University working together to learn about new media and its technologies. We’ll focus specifically on its impact on PR/Advertising.

Components/Purpose of the Blog

  • Weekly blog posts
  • Post about new media and its relationship with PR/Advertising
  • Dialogue-centered learning for us AND you
  • Incorporate videos/images whenever applicable (everyone loves that more than boring words, right?)
  • Connect our readers with other resources to learn about new media and technology
  • KEEP YOU INTERESTED! We really don’t want to be a dread. We’re fun people – promise.

Feel free to follow our blog at the bottom of the page via e-mail. We look forward to talking with you!