Vine and YOU

Credit to Tech Crunch http://goo.gl/eJDnt

Credit to Tech Crunch http://goo.gl/eJDnt

Do you find yourself lying in bed at night wondering how else you can get connected? Lucky for you, Twitter’s new standalone app, Vine, is the latest media craze. Users can create six-second videos by holding their finger on the screen. When you lift your finger off, it stops recording; leaving you with the ability to record any sequence of six seconds into a video (Pocket-Lint).
These videos can then be shared on the Vine app, as well as be embedded into Facebook and Twitter posts. You can follow other users, “like” videos, and comment on them just like any other social media site. Vine is essentially Instagram with sound and motion, unfiltered.

Uses:
As great as Vine seems for just killing time and expressing some creativity, it can also uniquely be used to build/promote your business. This app gives you the ability to show 360 degree views (a boutique could circle around a new pair of shoes); you can use stop motion (a restaurant could show the progression of a dish being made); or you could show before and after pictures (a stylist could show a client before and after their treatment). (Steam Feed).

The possibilities are endless.

Vine is also a very nice, non-pressured way of getting into video. It holds a little more artistic class than YouTube by the very nature of the way that it’s shot and the six-second limit is a good ceiling to channel your ideas about what you can do with it. You also don’t need any video editing skills whatsoever. ~Pocket-Lint

If you’re thinking of giving this whole Vine thing a try, keep these tips in mind…

Vine Tips

  1. Visual Simplicity
    You want to be able to reach your whole audience, right? Try to avoid trying to send a complex message in a six second window.
  2. Integrate Customers
    By making contact with your customers, you’ll be able to create a community by generating more activity. By integrating DIY videos, creating contests, and allowing other users to send their ideas to you, you’ll be able to get feedback while showing your appreciation to your customers.
  3. Niche Market
    Show your customers who you are, humanize yourself a little! You can share videos of employees so the community can get to know them, tell stories through your videos; give them a reason to come back.
  4. Easy Discovery
    Just like Instagram and Twitter, you can add hashtags to help other users find your material. By incorporating tags, you are giving the community the opportunity to search keywords and find videos based on their interests; which, in this case, is hopefully you! (Red Rokk)

As with any social network, remember to be creative. It’s easy to get lost in the media blunder, but by having a unique/quirky edge, you are sure to find an interested market.

Additional Tips

If you are interested in using Vine for your business/organization, itech224 has a pretty good YouTube video that can get you started.

Go More In-Depth…

We never want you to feel limited to only what we’ve posted. Here are a list of other articles you can check out:

Next Week

We’ll look into Pinterest. For this week, what do you think about Vine? Have you used it or seen it in use?

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Superbowl Ad Recap

Ads and Social Media

Well, the 49ers almost made it. Ugh, so close. I could hardly sit still watching the 4th quarter. However, it’s fair to say the first half of the game was rather dull. Luckily, I was preoccupied playing “ad bingo” until things picked up.

This week is going to have a little less structure and a little more free-form talk. We just want to pull out some things we noticed this year with the Super Bowl ads. There were some funny ads, some grandeur, and others just icky (yes, Go Daddy). Also, Dodge’s “God Made a Farmer” ad had us Midwesterners all up in a nostalgic tizzy.

But what separated this year’s Super Bowl ads from the past? The emphasis on social media, the interaction between consumers and the companies, the attempt to connect – that’s what was different.

Twitter was King

According to Marketing Land, there were 52 national TV commercials during the Super Bowl. Of those 52 ads, 26 mentioned Twitter – that’s 50 percent! Facebook only got 4 mentions, and Google+ was left in the dust with none. But isn’t G+ reportedly the No. 2 social network in the world? Hm, interesting.

Let’s take a look into Twitter then, since it was the hot topic.

Hashtags

While 26 ads featured Twitter, did their hashtags actually work? Did Subway’s clunky hashtag “#15yrwinningstreak” find its way into onto our home feeds?

Super-Bowl-Hash-Tag-Infographic

^^Those are pretty good numbers for Doritos and CK, and as Sysomos mentions, the two ads that used their own name as a hashtag had better results.

If we look at those numbers on their own, thousands of tweets for Doritos looks great, but if you consider the millions of tweets in America every day, that’s actually a pretty small number. While many tweets were about the Super Bowl or the advertisements, few people actually used the designated hashtags.

That doesn’t mean people did tweet about the Super Bowl ads. Taco Bell received 215,000 tweets after their funny “Viva Young” commercial – and they didn’t use a hashtag.

So maybe the mentions of Twitter in the ads didn’t quite work, but Twitter mentioning the ads sure did.

Power Outage

Forbes had a clever line about the power outage – “Call it the Super Bowl of real-time marketing.” Usually viewers are wrapped up in the game and ads, but the power outage slowed things down. Since there were no commercials during the outage, people grew bored, pulled out their smartphones, and started chatting on social media – about the game, the ads, and who pulled the plug.

Smart advertisers knew what to do with the outage with a spike of tweeters online. Companies like Walgreens, Oreo, Tide, and Audi hit the Twittersphere and capitalized the opportunity by tweeting clever lines about their product and the outage.

The power outage was the epitome of real-time marketing.

tide-super-bowl-black-out-tweet

Oreo-dunk-dark-tweet17

Wrap Up

Maybe Twitter was more popular this Super Bowl because of its immediacy and simplicity. A consumer can tweet without talking too much attention away from the game. But why did Facebook lose so much attention? And why did Google+ receive no love for the second year in a row? Let us know what you think, and we can toss around ideas.

Go More In-Depth…

We never want you to feel limited to only what we’ve posted. Here are a list of other articles you can check out: